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    Exterior shot of projector apparatus. 3D printed ABS plastic.

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    Installation shot of Burnouts. Center for Ongoing Research and Projects, Columbus, OH.

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    Installation shot of Burnouts. Center for Ongoing Research and Projects, Columbus, OH.

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    Installation shot of Burnouts. Center for Ongoing Research and Projects, Columbus, OH.

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    Lenses for projectors stripped from discarded overhead projectors.

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    Projected image of retired constellation, Officina Typographica. The projections are animated, slowly rotating star groups. Once every minute or so, the lines connecting the stars faintly fade into view (as seen here), and then fade back out.

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    Interior shot of Burnouts projector, made on industrial 3D printer using ABS plastic. Lenses stripped from discarded overhead projectors.

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    3D design for projector.

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    Portion of the sky that was referred to as Globus Aerostaticus, The Hot Air Balloon, once upon a time.

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    The 5 discarded iPhones that drive the projections from within the 3D-printed projector apparatus.

Burnouts is a series of five sculptural video projectors that project animations of retired constellations on the gallery ceiling.  Christensen designed the outer cases for the projectors with rapid prototype technology (also known as 3D printing); the projectors are powered completely by discarded iPhones and parts from trashed overhead projectors. This juxtaposition of outdated and current technologies comments on our rapid cycle of technology consumption, and how quickly the new becomes the old. The light of the iPhone is directed through a system of lenses and mirrors stripped from the overheads, before the image is projected on to the ceiling of the gallery. The  projected animations are of constellations in the night sky that have been deemed no longer relevant to the field of astronomy due to light pollution, and so they have been retired from official star maps. Christensen learned that as star charts are updated, the International Astronomical Union decides certain constellations are no longer useful to the study of the stars, usually due to light pollution. Thus, these constellations are left off of all future star maps. Five of these retired constellations were named after technological devices––The Hot Air Balloon, Herschel’s Telescope, The Sundial, The Electric Generator, and The Printing Office. Christensen worked with astronomers and a planetarium staff to locate where they must have once been visible in order to create animations of these star groups. The projection of these five constellations is a poetic metaphor for the technology producing the image––just as the constellations are still there and yet no longer in use, so are our own outdated gadgets.

For additional images/information about Burnouts, visit the project page on the Upgrade Available website, which can be found HERE.

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Burnouts was created with support of a Creative Capital grant (Emerging Fields, 2013)